Category Archives: GUEST EDITOR

From The Desk Of The Feelies: John Coltrane’s “A Love Supreme”

“Stay the course. Keep on trying.” So sings Glenn Mercer on the Feelies’ In Between, their sixth album and second since rebooting in 2008. Last year, the Haledon, N.J., band founded by guitarists Mercer and Bill Million celebrated its 40th anniversary. Crazy Rhythms, their frenetic, classic debut, arrived in 1980, but they waited six years for their second, the comparatively sedate The Good Earth. That was the first Feelies album with the band’s current lineup of Mercer, Million, bassist Brenda Sauter, drummer Stan Demeski and percussionist Dave Weckerman. After the (relatively) quick run of three albums between 1986 and 1991, the band retired until Sonic Youth coaxed a reunion in 2008 that led to sporadic touring and to 2011’s Here Before. The Feelies will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our new feature on them.

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Demeski: I got into jazz a little bit later, mostly because there were a lot of jazz snobs in college. The records didn’t seem as readily available and you didn’t have the internet where you could search things. And to be honest, I was too busy spending what money I had on VU, Beatles and Rolling Stones bootlegs during those years. Anyway, I guess by the mid-’80s, a nice vinyl reissue came out and I picked it up at Pier Platters. About 15 years later, the super-deluxe two-CD version came out with a Paris concert of the record as the second CD. Tenor sax is one of my favorite instruments, and I love Coltrane’s playing. Elvin Jones gives a performance that’s like a drum lesson each time I listen.

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From The Desk Of The Feelies: Steve Reich’s “Drumming” LP Set

“Stay the course. Keep on trying.” So sings Glenn Mercer on the Feelies’ In Between, their sixth album and second since rebooting in 2008. Last year, the Haledon, N.J., band founded by guitarists Mercer and Bill Million celebrated its 40th anniversary. Crazy Rhythms, their frenetic, classic debut, arrived in 1980, but they waited six years for their second, the comparatively sedate The Good Earth. That was the first Feelies album with the band’s current lineup of Mercer, Million, bassist Brenda Sauter, drummer Stan Demeski and percussionist Dave Weckerman. After the (relatively) quick run of three albums between 1986 and 1991, the band retired until Sonic Youth coaxed a reunion in 2008 that led to sporadic touring and to 2011’s Here Before. The Feelies will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our new feature on them.

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Demeski: I got this at my friend’s store in NYC, probably mid-’80s. It’s a German issue, so it’s a great quality pressing and package. It always astounds me when they start out kind of sparse, start playing more together, adding other players, then seemingly going out of phase or time with each other. Only to end up back together. Steve Reich and Philip Glass were my two main introductions to “new” music. I still play the orchestral bell side at the holidays because it’s sounds like a bunch of sleigh bells being played simultaneously.

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From The Desk Of The Feelies: James Brown’s “I Cant Stand Myself” 45

“Stay the course. Keep on trying.” So sings Glenn Mercer on the Feelies’ In Between, their sixth album and second since rebooting in 2008. Last year, the Haledon, N.J., band founded by guitarists Mercer and Bill Million celebrated its 40th anniversary. Crazy Rhythms, their frenetic, classic debut, arrived in 1980, but they waited six years for their second, the comparatively sedate The Good Earth. That was the first Feelies album with the band’s current lineup of Mercer, Million, bassist Brenda Sauter, drummer Stan Demeski and percussionist Dave Weckerman. After the (relatively) quick run of three albums between 1986 and 1991, the band retired until Sonic Youth coaxed a reunion in 2008 that led to sporadic touring and to 2011’s Here Before. The Feelies will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our new feature on them.

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Demeski: Growing up, I was familiar with James Brown but not a real lot. In my early college years, there was a good amount funk music around and then you had the “punk funk” thing and I suppose that’s where I first heard this. The No New York LP included the Contortions’ version, and that led me to seek out the original version. I got my copy at the Hackensack Record King, which I believe is still there. They had a surprisingly large selection of JB 45s back then. Still not an easy drum part to play and really ahead of it’s time when you consider the year of its release.

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From The Desk Of The Feelies: Elvis’ “Trying To Get To You” 45

“Stay the course. Keep on trying.” So sings Glenn Mercer on the Feelies’ In Between, their sixth album and second since rebooting in 2008. Last year, the Haledon, N.J., band founded by guitarists Mercer and Bill Million celebrated its 40th anniversary. Crazy Rhythms, their frenetic, classic debut, arrived in 1980, but they waited six years for their second, the comparatively sedate The Good Earth. That was the first Feelies album with the band’s current lineup of Mercer, Million, bassist Brenda Sauter, drummer Stan Demeski and percussionist Dave Weckerman. After the (relatively) quick run of three albums between 1986 and 1991, the band retired until Sonic Youth coaxed a reunion in 2008 that led to sporadic touring and to 2011’s Here Before. The Feelies will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our new feature on them.

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Demeski: Yes, it’s from the Sun years. No I don’t have a copy on Sun. Yet. Mine’s an RCA stock copy. This is probably my favorite Elvis song. Between the vocal performance, the wild guitar and the great drum feel, you can’t get much better than this. I like most of what Elvis did up until the army/movie years, and I even like some stuff from the later years. But if Elvis had only done the Sun recordings and disappeared, it would have been more than enough.

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From The Desk Of The Feelies: Bo Diddley’s “Cracking Up” 45

“Stay the course. Keep on trying.” So sings Glenn Mercer on the Feelies’ In Between, their sixth album and second since rebooting in 2008. Last year, the Haledon, N.J., band founded by guitarists Mercer and Bill Million celebrated its 40th anniversary. Crazy Rhythms, their frenetic, classic debut, arrived in 1980, but they waited six years for their second, the comparatively sedate The Good Earth. That was the first Feelies album with the band’s current lineup of Mercer, Million, bassist Brenda Sauter, drummer Stan Demeski and percussionist Dave Weckerman. After the (relatively) quick run of three albums between 1986 and 1991, the band retired until Sonic Youth coaxed a reunion in 2008 that led to sporadic touring and to 2011’s Here Before. The Feelies will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our new feature on them.

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Demeski: I first heard the Rolling Stones kind of reggae version of this on Love You Live. Later, the earlier version they did on the BBC surfaced, and that sounds more like Bo’s version. Apparently, Bo didn’t like the Bo Diddley beat, and this record doesn’t have one. It’s more of a rumba/Latin type feel. Great drumming and really funny lyrics.

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From The Desk Of The Feelies: Roxy Music’s “Street Life” 45

“Stay the course. Keep on trying.” So sings Glenn Mercer on the Feelies’ In Between, their sixth album and second since rebooting in 2008. Last year, the Haledon, N.J., band founded by guitarists Mercer and Bill Million celebrated its 40th anniversary. Crazy Rhythms, their frenetic, classic debut, arrived in 1980, but they waited six years for their second, the comparatively sedate The Good Earth. That was the first Feelies album with the band’s current lineup of Mercer, Million, bassist Brenda Sauter, drummer Stan Demeski and percussionist Dave Weckerman. After the (relatively) quick run of three albums between 1986 and 1991, the band retired until Sonic Youth coaxed a reunion in 2008 that led to sporadic touring and to 2011’s Here Before. The Feelies will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our new feature on them.

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Demeski: I have a German copy of this song with a pretty wacky picture sleeve that seemed pretty typical of German picture sleeves of that period. This was the first Roxy Music I heard, initially as the music in a commercial for Stranded that ran once or twice during the airing of ABC’s In Concert show on Friday nights during the ’70s. It was pretty shocking, like nothing I had heard before. Not long afterward, I picked the LP up as an import. I got the 45 about six years later and I tend to play it during the summer since that’s when I initially heard it.

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From The Desk Of The Feelies: The New York Dolls’ “Personality Crisis”/”Looking For A Kiss” Demo Versions 45

“Stay the course. Keep on trying.” So sings Glenn Mercer on the Feelies’ In Between, their sixth album and second since rebooting in 2008. Last year, the Haledon, N.J., band founded by guitarists Mercer and Bill Million celebrated its 40th anniversary. Crazy Rhythms, their frenetic, classic debut, arrived in 1980, but they waited six years for their second, the comparatively sedate The Good Earth. That was the first Feelies album with the band’s current lineup of Mercer, Million, bassist Brenda Sauter, drummer Stan Demeski and percussionist Dave Weckerman. After the (relatively) quick run of three albums between 1986 and 1991, the band retired until Sonic Youth coaxed a reunion in 2008 that led to sporadic touring and to 2011’s Here Before. The Feelies will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our new feature on them.

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Demeski: This is on the fabulous Bellaphon label (the one that put out the Beatles at the Star Club record), and I’m not really sure what they are. Other than they seem to be pre-first LP demo, and they have Billy Doll on them. There’s actually two 45s of these demos, and all four songs are slower then they would end up being on the first LP. Great versions, and you can see that Jerry Nolan picked up where Billy left off. Great, simple drumming that perfectly fits the songs. The covers of both of these are some of the ugliest picture sleeves ever.

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From The Desk Of The Feelies: My Original Copy Of “Trout Mask Replica”

“Stay the course. Keep on trying.” So sings Glenn Mercer on the Feelies’ In Between, their sixth album and second since rebooting in 2008. Last year, the Haledon, N.J., band founded by guitarists Mercer and Bill Million celebrated its 40th anniversary. Crazy Rhythms, their frenetic, classic debut, arrived in 1980, but they waited six years for their second, the comparatively sedate The Good Earth. That was the first Feelies album with the band’s current lineup of Mercer, Million, bassist Brenda Sauter, drummer Stan Demeski and percussionist Dave Weckerman. After the (relatively) quick run of three albums between 1986 and 1991, the band retired until Sonic Youth coaxed a reunion in 2008 that led to sporadic touring and to 2011’s Here Before. The Feelies will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our new feature on them.

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Demeski: I got my first copy of this for Christmas 1973, during my eighth grade year of grammar school. That one was a mid-’70s Reprise issue. I guess about five years later, my friend picked this copy up for me at Second Coming Records in Greenwich Village. While I like Lick My Decals Off, Baby a little more, well, this an incredible LP. It’s like an LSD trip on vinyl. It’s not an easy listen but John French’s drumming is one of the most original and interesting musical statements ever. His playing made me realize you didn’t have to play standard drum beats. Mint condition with lyric sheet.

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From The Desk Of The Feelies: Skull Cover Copy Of “White Light/White Heat” Signed By Lou Reed

“Stay the course. Keep on trying.” So sings Glenn Mercer on the Feelies’ In Between, their sixth album and second since rebooting in 2008. Last year, the Haledon, N.J., band founded by guitarists Mercer and Bill Million celebrated its 40th anniversary. Crazy Rhythms, their frenetic, classic debut, arrived in 1980, but they waited six years for their second, the comparatively sedate The Good Earth. That was the first Feelies album with the band’s current lineup of Mercer, Million, bassist Brenda Sauter, drummer Stan Demeski and percussionist Dave Weckerman. After the (relatively) quick run of three albums between 1986 and 1991, the band retired until Sonic Youth coaxed a reunion in 2008 that led to sporadic touring and to 2011’s Here Before. The Feelies will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our new feature on them.

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Demeski: This is my favorite VU LP, and while I have a Banana LP signed by four out of five members, this one is a bit neater. Lou signed it directly to me. Anyway, 1988 was a pretty big year for the band and me personally. We released our first A&M LP, did extensive (for us at least) touring and got Lou to come up and play a few songs with us at a radio-station party at a weird venue on Long Island. Add to this that my wife and I got married a week before this event and you get the picture. Lou showed up late, I introduced myself and gave him a run down on what we were going to do and then asked him if he played on the All Night Workers’ “Why Don’t You Smile.” His response was a predictable, “I can’t remember.” Then I got him to sign the LP.

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From The Desk Of Delicate Steve: Delicate Steve Bios (Klosterman And Azerrad)

Steve Marion would like you to know, first and foremost, that he’s a human being. That’s why the New Jersey-bred guitar maestro’s given name is right there in the moniker of his primary musical project—Delicate Steve is both the four-piece live band Marion fronts and the superhero alias he assumes for his one-man recording output—and in the title of his long-in-the-works third LP. Marion will be guest editing magnet magazine.com all week. Read our feature.

Marion: Delicate Steve has had two superstar press releases written. One is an entirely fictional bio by Chuck Klosterman that got us a lot of attention including this NPR story Everything You Know About This Band Is Wrong. Interviewers incorrectly assume we were trying to pull a stunt, when in fact it was done to make people think a more about what a bio is and how silly they can be. Getting Chuck to write our bio without ever interviewing me or hearing the music was an art piece. That’s how I think of it. The second bio for Delicate Steve was written by Michael Azerrad. For anyone who knows Michael, you know he is one of the most positive people around. And such a strong supporter of the New York music scene over the years. And not only a supporter, but someone who knows exactly what’s going on. Michael has gotten to be around some of the best musicians and music scenes in the history of music, so to see him at your show or your friends’ show is always a treat. Because that’s the kind of thing that keeps you creating and pushing things forward and staying in the moment.

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