Category Archives: BEST OF 2014

Best Of 2014: Movies

Birdman

Yes, it’s true! MAGNET editor Eric T. Miller’s hellacious work schedule once again leaves him absolutely no time for something as frivolous as picking the five best films of 2014 for the unwashed masses who demand such things. It’s left to the office’s Bob Cratchit (otherwise known as Jud Cost) to shovel the last few pieces of coal onto the fire and stay late to get his copy in while Scrooge (Miller) has a bountiful dinner at a local hostelry. Cost has finally shaken that wimpy “no particular order” bug of years past and insists that these five movies are, yes sir-ee Bob, in a carefully picked order.

1) Birdman
My old man used to shoot rambling Super-8 reels of my brothers and me “spear-fishing” for trout, using snorkel masks, flippers and a camp-knife lashed to a willow branch in the snow-fed source of the American River near Lake Tahoe, Calif. All we ever caught beneath those frigid waters was a blinding headache. But those jittery images somehow returned to me as I watched Birdman, shot unlike any professional movie I’ve ever seen. Its actors seem to make their entrance by jumping onto the ramp of a spinning carousel. A shoulder-held camera, seemingly bumping into things while trying to follow Riggan Thomson (Michael Keaton) as he darts around the battered corners of Broadway’s venerated St. James Theatre, may have you reaching for the sea-sickness meds. A veteran movie actor, Riggan is trying to improve his public image by doing something more lasting than donning that stupid Birdman costume for yet another slice of this blockbuster franchise’s meatloaf. Some sources falsely reported Birdman was shot all in one take. Not true, although most of its scenes are very long and must be precisely choreographed. But nothing stands in the way of Alejandro González Iñárritu’s whirling masterpiece, perhaps the most irresistible movie made in the new millennium.

2) Boyhood
Like Birdman‘s signature skittering pace, Boyhood also has something unique in its makeup. Director Richard Linklater shot the film annually over a period of 12 years. He began with a six-year-old kid named Mason (Ellar Coltrane) and, fingers crossed all the way, no doubt, finished with a young man of 18, about to enter college. Linklater needn’t have worried: The kid is a revelation. Filming every year makes the age progression of its characters appear seamlessly organic in the final production. Ethan Hawke, who plays Mason’s dad, mentioned to his real wife that he’d just done the best work of his life, about five years into the project. When she asked when she’d be able to see it, he had to answer, “In about seven years.” Describing Boyhood‘s everyday story line is like describing Moby Dick as a book about a crazy guy and a whale. To boil it down: It’s the nothing more than the story of Mason, his older sister Samantha (played by Linklater’s daughter Lorelei), their divorced mom (Patricia Arquette) and their dad. Mom’s concerned about such things as the kids doing their homework and getting enough to eat, while Dad, who picks up the kids every other weekend, takes them bowling and teaches them how to play golf; nothing out of the ordinary. It’s the sweet way they go about it that makes all the difference.

3) American Sniper
Great anti-war novels—from The Red Badge Of Courage, War And Peace and All Quiet On The Western Front to The Naked And The Dead, On The Beach and From Here To Eternity—have attracted large followings, whether in print or adapted to the big screen—or both. You could probably get many different answers as to whether American Sniper, one of Clint Eastwood’s most telling shots in a storied career, should join those esteemed ranks. Or whether its stance is even anti-war, at all. Take it from me, it is. Staggering your way through a battle scene that’s engulfed by a blinding sandstorm to the point where you can’t tell who’s shooting whom should convince anyone. Bradley Cooper is almost unrecognizable here as Chris Kyle, the Navy Seal whose hundreds of known kills have made him the most accurate sniper in U.S. military history. Kyle accompanies units sent to highly volatile spots and takes out any resistance they may encounter. But the real battle takes place when he returns to the Texas home of his wife and two kids when his current tour of duty is over. Adjusting to grocery shopping or getting the car lubed when his mind is still in Afghanistan proves next to impossible. By the time Kyle begins his fourth tour of duty, the egg is about to crack.

4) Whiplash
Without the jaw-dropping performance of J.K. Simmons, it’s safe to say Whiplash would not have existed. Previously best known as a CIA officer trying to clean up the mess made by Frances McDormand and Brad Pitt in the Coen brothers’ Burn After Reading and, more recently, as an insurance company’s spokesman in TV commercials, Simmons, at age 59, gives the performance of a lifetime here. He is Terence Fletcher, the instructor of the advanced jazz band at Shaffer, a prestigious East Coast music school a la Berklee or Juilliard. It’s safe to say, the most hard-boiled Marine drill instructor ever committed to celluloid couldn’t have matched Simmons’ maniacal intensity. His students visibly shake when they hear his footsteps approaching the band’s practice room. The instructor’s principal adversary is Andrew Neiman (Miles Teller), a peach-fuzzed jazz drummer who doesn’t stand a chance when Fletcher gets hold of him. To prove a point about tempo, Fletcher gets in Neiman’s face and asks him to count out a four-beat measure. A micro-second before (or after) Neiman reaches “four,” Fletcher viciously slaps the hapless percussionist in the face, then asks him if he was rushing or dragging the beat. Director Damien Chazelle reportedly told Simmons he wanted to see him “take it past what he thought the limit was. I want to see a monster.” That’s exactly what he got.

5) The Imitation Game
Several years after the 1939 declaration of war between England and Germany, at the height of World War II, the British were being mercilessly bombed by the German Luftwaffe, night after night, just as its ships were also being sunk on the high seas by Nazi submarines. The code the Germans used to orchestrate this reign of terror was deemed unbreakable until Alan Turing came along, confident that he could do what no one else had accomplished. Turing (Benedict Cumberbatch) was already building what would become the world’s first computer, a giant piece of hardware that he would employ to finally beat the Germans at their own game. The smartest of those selected to form a team at Bletchley Park turned out to be Mary Clarke (Keira Knightley), whose proximity to Turing during stressful times helped form a permanent bond between them. Just not the kind of bond she’d hoped it might be. When he finally told her he was a homosexual, she admitted she’d pretty much already figured that out, and it wouldn’t make any difference to her. Turing is known nowadays as the father of artificial intelligence whose work not only saved countless lives but paved the way for the computer that remains the backbone of today’s daily life. In post-WWII England, he was thought of by his less than grateful government as just another pansy to be sent off to jail.

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Best Of 2014: Q&A With Ex Hex

ExHex1

If we’re handing out superlatives, we have to award Best Phone Skills to Mary Timony for the rather hilarious way she started our Monday morning conversation. It was a simple hello delivered with quizzical sitcom-quality timing that surprises both of us—maybe it means the Suzi Quatro/Leather Tuscadero references we’d used to describe her new band, Ex Hex, and debut album Rips weren’t entirely off base. And just like the Happy Days rock ‘n’ roller, Rips is just too cool, one of the raging guitar-pop albums that record nerds dream about. “It has been kind of insane,” says Timony. “We just got back from tour, and we’ve been extremely busy. Just a lot of driving and playing—a crazy tour. But it’s good to be back.”

The band is indeed busy—24 hours after we talk, Timony and Co. will be making their Late Night With Seth Meyers debut—and shows no sign of slowing down. Since its first set of shows in the spring (yes, you read that right: first tour ever), Ex Hex has dropped two videos of slapstick alt-rock shenanigans, wooed critics just about everywhere and wowed fans across the country. For real, when MAGNET saw Ex Hex open for Rocket From The Crypt, the ladies had barely unplugged before we were sending out “BEST. BAND. EVER” texts to every person we know. Needless to say, deciding on our album of the year was a no-brainer. We caught up with Timony to chat about skipping work to go see metal shows, public-access TV and punk-rock pastry chefs. —Sean L. Maloney

What was the best show you played in 2014?
It was in Minneapolis a couple of weeks ago on this tour. There were a few reasons it was a crazy night. I mean, the night was crazy, which is why it was my favorite, but it was actually a really good show. You could tell people had heard the record, and people were smiling and dancing, which was really fun. I love playing the 7th Street Entry because that’s where parts of Purple Rain were filmed. So, that’s always fun. There were like four shows … there was a huge hip-hop show—I don’t remember who it was—playing down the street, the Black Keys were playing across the street at some convention-center thing, and at this other club Pentagram was playing, which was really weird. So, we end up playing a really fun show. We get offstage and go to the merch stand, and this girl came up to us. Somehow she had a connection to the Pentagram show. So, we abandon the merch stand—which is very irresponsible [laughs], not a responsible thing to do—but we left it all there to see Pentagram. And it was fucking awesome. It was the best show—Pentagram is so cool and I love all those songs. So, we just walked down the street and saw Pentagram. I feel bad if anybody wanted a record—I’m sorry. We just left a sign that said “Back in 10 minutes.” [Laughs] That was definitely my favorite.

Who was your favorite band of 2014?
I knew we were going to do this interview, so I made a list of my favorite records. It’s hard to pick just one. I’ve been listening to Ed Schrader’s Music Beat—they’re from Baltimore. I’ve heard that live it is just the best thing you’ve ever seen—I haven’t seen them, but that’s what I’ve heard. My friends played with them and were freaking out about it. I really like that record. ’m excited about this band Public Access TV; I don’t know if they really have anything out yet. Do you remember that band Be Your Own Pet? John Eatherly from that band has a new band—I know him from when he played with Eleanor Friedberger. When he was playing with Eleanor, Wild Flag was on tour with them, and somehow I got some of the demos they made in GarageBand. I think a friend sent them to me? But they are so good, and I keep listening to those demos over and over again. And he’s got a new band, and I’ve only heard a few songs online, but they’re the same songs from the demos. They’re really good. Oh, and I’m obsessed with that King Tuff record—it’s probably my favorite record of the year. I am really excited about the Slant 6 Soda Pop Rip Off reissue on Dischord. That’s probably my reissue of the year. That’s one of my favorite records, and it’s nice to know that it’s coming back, that people still love it. I know some younger people [in old-man voice] I know of some younger people [laughs] that really love that record, but they are D.C. people. It’s one of those records that it’s confusing why it’s not a bigger thing. I don’t know—I’m glad that it’s reissued because it is so fucking good.

And what was your best meal of 2014?
Do you know (Born Against/Universal Order Of Armageddon drummer) Brooks Headley? He just had a book come out (Fancy Desserts) about being a pastry chef. We got totally lucky—he hooked us up at Del Posto in New York and let us try all of this amazing food. It’s like the fanciest restaurant in New York, and he hooked us up with a huge-huge-huge mega-discount, so that was really fun. It was this really incredible Italian food, and then a bunch of his desserts that were just out of control. I mean, there was like 10 of them and they were all incredible, all these sorbets and chocolates. It was insane. They were so good.

—photo by Gene Smirnov

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MAGNET’s Top 25 Albums Of 2014

25. The Afghan Whigs | Do To The Beast (Sub Pop)
AfghanWhigsReunion albums suck. And reunion albums with only two original members plus hired hands and special guests really suck, right? Not always. Do To The Beast is the first Afghan Whigs album in 16 years, and features just singer Greg Dulli and bassist John Curley from their ’90s lineup. But it’s as vital as Congregation, Gentlemen or anything else from the halcyon days. The bruising guitar riffs of “Parked Outside,” “Matamoros” and “Royal Cream” prove the band’s swagger is seemingly inexhaustible. Beast is also an eclectic work, reflecting Dulli’s love for all things cinematic. “It Kills” and “Lost In The Woods” are darkly dramatic piano ballads. “Algiers” heads into spaghetti-Western territory. Throughout, Dulli finds new angles for his pet themes of obsessive love, Catholic guilt and deadly crimes. (“If my desire for your company/Made this motherfucker point his gun at me” is a pretty typical lyric.) The band subtly blends in its soul and hip-hop influences through the assertive strut of the rhythms and the alpha-male vulnerability in Dulli’s voice. While no period piece, Do To The Beast is lean and funky like a ’70s masterpiece, inspired equally by Bobby Womack and William Friedkin. —Michael Pelusi

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24. Ryan Adams | Ryan Adams (Pax Am)
RyanAdamsAlt-country, alt-pop, punk, rock, metal, blues, transformative covers, soundtrack-ready anthems— you never know what you’re gonna get with Ryan Adams, one of music’s most unpredictable polymaths. On this self-titled project, he settles into his sweet spot, like a power hitter waiting for a waist-high fastball down the middle, and goes yard. The album kicks off with a potent one-two combo: “Gimme Something Good,” with sharp, bluesy riffs and a vintage Tom Petty vibe (bolstered by founding Heartbreakers member Benmont Tench’s soulful organ), followed by the sparse, plaintive “Kim,” with Adams at his heartbroken best. As a singer/songwriter, he’s always put equal emphasis on both sides of the craft, with a knack for fashioning hooks you can’t easily shake off. Note the magic in the simplicity of “Am I Safe,” a melancholy strummer with a dark underbelly (“It’s complicated/I just don’t love you anymore/I just want to sit here and watch it burn”). Adams deserves a place among the best American songsmiths, in the tradition of Dylan and Springsteen. Maybe his genre-hopping makes him tough to pin down, or his mercurial personality leaves him feeling unknowable, hard to define. Of course, it’s the music that matters. Let this album stand as yet more evidence that he’s one of the greats. —Richard Rys

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23. Perfume Genius | Too Bright (Matador)
PerfumeGeniusTo those who waded through the oft-overwhelming melancholy of Perfume Genius’ last LP, 2012’s Put Your Back N 2 It, the devastating one-two conclusion of “Floating Spit” into “Sister Song” might’ve sounded an awful lot like a coda to Mike Hadreas’ brief career, the sort of epilogue that it’s nearly impossible to conceive a sequel to. Funny, then, that less than two years later, Hadreas resurfaced with Too Bright. Aided by co-producers Geoff Barrow and John Parrish (whose combined credits include work with Portishead and PJ Harvey), Hadreas expands his sonic palette far beyond the spare, piano-driven style of his previous work, as he channels the best of both of the aforementioned, while elsewhere looking to Kate Bush and Scott Walker for inspiration—most audibly on striking, imagery-laden numbers “My Body” and “Longpig.” What results is truly masterful, challenging the notion that classic American songwriting must berooted in ’60s folk revivalism or ’80s indie jangle with the first truly great art-pop album of the decade. —Möhammad Choudhery

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22. Sloan | Commonwealth (Yep Roc)
Sloan If there were college courses for contemporary power pop, certain artists would inevitably appear on the syllabi. The Posies. Matthew Sweet. Teenage Fanclub. Weezer. Brendan Benson. And, most certainly, Sloan. To date, the Nova Scotians have released 11 albums over two decades with nary a dud in the mix. Quick, can you name one band with that kind of track record? Hell, even the Beatles had one clunker in their catalog. (Looking at you, Yellow Submarine.) Commonwealth maintains Sloan’s straight-A report card, and in a callback to a similar gambit by Gene, Paul, Ace and Peter, each band member claims a side on this double album. Fortunately, Commonwealth yields infinitely better results than the KISS solo albums. Ferguson and Murphy bring their usual guitar-pop goodness, dosing songs sweet as confectioner’s sugar with just the right amount of guitar squall, Pentland cranks the volume and dabbles in crunchy psychedelia, and drummer Scott closes with 18 minutes of sprawling weirdness, unwittingly creating the power-pop equivalent of Beastie Boys’ “B-Boy Bouillabaisse.” Which is to say, other than Scott’s contribution, Commonwealth sounds like a Sloan record. And really, isn’t that all you need to know? —Matt Ryan

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21. Lana Del Rey | Ultraviolence (Interscope)
LanaSubscribing to Lana Del Rey fandom means being down with variations on a particular character theme: the gutsy, 20-something sexual libertine with daddy issues who isn’t afraid to wreck a home or three. If 2012’s Born To Die paid tithes to hip hop’s conquering of popular music, then Ultraviolence dresses Del Rey’s anti-heroic straw women up in noir frocks that borrow liberally from various strains of gospel, country and rock—a rich pastiche of shoegazing, psychedelic guitar sighs, solemn organs, pianos that defer and flatter. Ultraviolence is fantastically and willfully out of step with modern culture and memes, spinning apart from the now—a series of black-and-white movies or short stories where tragedy lurks a few beats or notes beyond where each song ends. So, belly up to the bar for fried bliss-outs about shady, incorrigible beaus (“Shades Of Cool,” “Ultraviolence”), nightmare hippie/hipster girls (troll-bait single “Brooklyn Baby”) and slightly more grown-up iterations of the “li’l starlet” who reigned on Born (“The Other Woman”). Del Rey’s fine, husky voice melts sumptuously into what are essentially warm, organic torch songs; principal production by Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach results in a timeless sound that feels older than creation. Also, pro-tip: Do yourself a solid and forego the deluxe version. —Raymond Cummings

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20. Swans | To Be Kind (Drag City)
SwansBecause at the age of 60, Michael Gira still creates thunderous, hammering, complex music that beats the punk ass off any pack of young Turks in any given year. Because To Be Kind is another in a recent series of increasingly impressive multi-disc releases from the remade Swans that absolutely earns the extended format. Because Swans’ current personnel list is the tightest, most organic iteration of the band since the lineup that made Cop in 1984. Because that intuition and interplay makes the group sound like a single huge set of hands working a single huge instrument. Because Swans’ drummer’s honest-to-god name is “Thor.” But mostly because To Be Kind is the sort of record the mature Swans always had in them, and have been approaching more and more lately: a record that hits as hard as their brutal early work, but with a clear sense of control, and an intricate shapeliness, that makes the album as rewarding second-by-second as it is impressive as a unit. —Eric Waggoner

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19. Parquet Courts | Sunbathing Animal (What’s Your Rupture?/Mom + Pop)
ParquetSunbathing Animal arrived at a crucial time for Parquet Courts. Following the breakout success of Light Up Gold and preceding the new Content Nausea, the album finds the ever-restless quartet expanding into unexpected territories. Searching for a second coming of punk’s saviors? Look no further than the breakneck title track and “Ducking And Dodging,” which warp the Black Flag/Minor Threat headrush into workouts nearly four times the length of those pioneering bands’ outbursts. Early releases hinted at a more expressionist side to the band, and Sunbathing Animal’s true highlights are its unhurried moments. “She’s Rolling” starts with a lumbering beat and devolves into a dissonant coda led by a piercing harmonica. Perhaps the prettiest song the band’s ever written, “Instant Disassembly” uses the repetition of a simple guitar figure to underscore the sound of a life and relationship falling apart in a very mechanical fashion. It all comes together to form one of the year’s most eclectic, yet instantly likeable collections. When I mentioned to guitarist Austin Brown that I’d be writing about Sunbathing Animal for this year-end roundup, he casually replied, “Oh yeah? They think we’re the best?” While I cannot by any means speak on behalf of this publication’s entire writing and editorial staff, I can safely say that yes, Austin, you guys are the best. —Eric Schuman

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18. Aphex Twin | Syro (Warp)
AphexTwinThirteen years is a long time between drinks when it comes to the quickly shifting electronic-music landscape. I mean, jungle? Who calls it that anymore, let alone thinks of that? Yet, Richard D. James and/or his Aphex Twin persona (one of half a dozen) doesn’t seem to care that a decade-plus has passed between projects. At least his sound doesn’t project that (make no mistake: James recorded as Caustic Window and other names during his break from Aphex). First, there are intense (even dramatic), melodic Chuck Close-like squiggles spotted in between Syro’s fluid, energetic bass lines and souped-up synthesizers. There’s even an archly soulful tone to these same synths, a grimily funky, hothouse humanity that goes handsomely with the powerhouse (real?!) drums of “180db_,” and the low, growling whirr of “Produk 29.” If you’re still thinking about Aphex Twin’s time in the electro-music biz, the most impressive fruit of that tenure—in regard to Syro is how the album gloms from the twittering past of his drum ‘n’ bass, test-pattern techno (as well as his most gorgeous piano etudes), and just allows it to be ever slightly more emotional. This isn’t new-and-improved neo-classical Aphex Twin or an epic reinvention: Syro just is. And is great. —A.D. Amorosi

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17. Cloud Nothings | Here And Nowhere Else (Carpark)
CloudNothingsEarlier in 2014, Cloud Nothings mastermind Dylan Baldi insisted to MAGNET that he was in a much better frame of mind for this record, compared to 2012’s acclaimed Attack On Memory. He’s either a liar or self-deluded. Here And Nowhere Else is eight songs of angry catharsis, lyrically and musically, the makings of some of the best indie punk in the two decades since Jawbox’s For Your Own Special Sweetheart. Baldi’s hoarse, adenoidal yelp is pushed into the red here with bracing results, akin to a teenage tantrum that is, improbably, a joy to behold. There is also the matter of Cloud Nothings’ secret weapon: drummer Jayson Gerycz. A cover boy for all the drum geek magazines if there ever was one, the guy plays with mind-boggling speed and dexterity, threatening to send every song off the rails while propelling them forward at 500 mph. Baldi and Co. have created a record that is deceptively simple (read: loud) upon superficial listen, but reveals an impressive trove of hooks and sonic complexity over the long haul. Teenage angst has paid off well for Cloud Nothings, and on Here And Nowhere Else, old and bored is nowhere in sight. —Matt Ryan

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16. The Hold Steady | Teeth Dreams (Razor & Tie)
HoldSteadyCraig Finn and Co. are joined by the excellent Steve Selvidge (who came along on the support tour for 2010’s introspective Heaven Is Whenever), and twin-attack guitars are suddenly the going thing once again. The Hold Steady continues to grow up in public, but where Heaven was the sound of a group figuring out how to transition from bar-band woodshedding into the complexity of middle age, privately and professionally, Teeth Dreams will likely be seen in hindsight as the point where the band members considered various paths, then said, “Fuck it,” and kicked a new one for themselves, retaining their youthful power while articulating the lessons of age. The group’s sixth album is as rewardingly energetic in places as anything it’s ever recorded (see “Spinners” and the barreling “Big Cig”), but it’s also the most literate and lyrically expressive album in its catalog to date, which is saying a hell of a lot for aband that started and stayed brainy without slipping into precious. The Hold Steady could likely keep making “Hold Steady albums” for as long as it wanted to—the formula works—but the group is still heading new and interesting places. The fact that it’s consistently been one of the smartest American bands of the past decade makes that journey all the more impressive. —Eric Waggoner

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15. tUnE-yArDs | Nikki Nack (4AD)
TuneYardsOf the nine musicians (and two comedians!) to appear on the cover of MAGNET in 2014, Merrill Garbus’ June photo shoot was the most emblematic. Her third LP as tUnE-yArDs is—like Ransom & Mitchell’s hyper-colored spread—by turns biting, goofy, explorative, introspective, far-out, dioramic, larger than life and more than a little freaky. What’s behind those yolky eyes, that “Black Hole Sun” smile? Overjoyed yet unsatisfied, Garbus—whose last album w h o kill became the first by a female artist to top the Village Voice’s Pazz & Jop critics’ poll since Lucinda Williams’ Car Wheels On A Gravel Road—hits the ground like 747 landing gear on a paved runway. “Find A New Way” issues the charge, and “Water Fountain” and “Real Thing,” two of the hottest tracks of this or any other calendar, answer it: double-Dutch schoolgirl singsong and En Vogue chromosomatic smackdown, respectively, at least on the surface. Then the cutting couplets materialize like Magic Eye, and they hit bone (“Greasy man, come and dig my well/Life without your water is a burning hell”; “I come from a land of slaves/Let’s go Redskins, let’s go Braves”). Objections sustained. Her politics sometimes overwhelm the party; her darted-up musical map flaunts its passport stamps; and please, God, someone pry off her shift keys with a butter knife. But Garbus couldn’t give a rice-stuffed shit what anyone thinks, and that kind of bravery is viral. —Noah Bonaparte Pais

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14. Steve Gunn | Way Out Weather (Paradise Of Bachelors)
SteveGunnSteve Gunn has been appearing on records for nearly a decade, and he made his first solo CD-R in 2007, but this is the year that he truly arrived. He released a pair of fantastic collaborative LPs with Mike Gangloff and Mike Cooper, and spent a big chunk of the year on the road in Europe and the U.S. But it’s Way Out Weather that has put him over the top. Already known as a guitarist with unerring instincts for the right way to illuminate any passage with a minimum of flash, Gunn has established himself as a songwriter with this album. Whether he’s observing the deranged characters that stalk the sidewalks of his Brooklyn neighborhood or mulling over the climate change that has put its streets under water, he articulates the age’s anxieties without dictating what you should think about them. He and his superb posse of accompanists (which includes Pelt’s Nathan Bowles, Tweedy’s Jim Elkington and harpist Mary Lattimore) have also found a way to update the no-frills boogie of early-’70s Grateful Dead and ambitiously hard-nosed folk/rock of similar vintage Michael Chapman with essences of Northwest Africa and Congo Square. —Bill Meyer

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13. Guided By Voices | Cool Planet / Motivational Jumpsuit (Guided By Voices Inc.)
GBVWhen Bob Pollard shuttered Guided By Voices (the first time) at the end of 2004, distressed fanboy wails could be heard far and wide. The songwriting savant had released solo records and other projects all along, but no one knew—except for him, maybe—that we wouldn’t be deprived of his singular genius just because GBV was kaput; the dozens of records he’s released since serve as obvious proof. So, Pollard’s recent kiboshing of the reformed GBV was greeted with an appropriate grateful-to-sad ratio, almost as if the very same fanboys were now aware of their good fortune. Pollard and crew leave us (chronologically) with Motivational Jumpsuit and Cool Planet, both of which feature the scattershot brilliance of the previous four new-GBV efforts. (Whether any of the six are in the same league as the previous incarnation’s product is a perhaps unnecessary debate for another day.) Jumpsuit gets the nod as best of the bunch, thanks in part to featuring “Shine (Tomahawk Breath),” guitarist Tobin Sprout’s greatest song, as a complement to the usual solid-and-then-some Pollard nuggets. On Cool Planet’s hard-charging titular finale, Pollard proclaims, “Heroes do matter” and tosses out, almost as an aside, “It’s a cool planet.” Our hero’s going to keep making music on it, so yeah. —Matt Hickey

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12. Ty Segall | Manipulator (Drag City)
TySegallHow can we miss you, Ty Segall, when you won’t go away? Here’s how: There isn’t one Ty Segall. There is a flock of Segalls, maybe hundreds of them, maybe more, and if you could glimpse more than one at once, they’d be circling overhead, some falling into formation, some splatting into phone booths, still others splitting off to follow their own whims. In collectively naming his trio of 2012 albums the second-best release of that year, this magazine concluded, “When Segall puts it all together into a focused, well-edited package, we could be witness to a rare but long-awaited seismic shift in rock ‘n’ roll.” The focused, well-edited package arrived nine months later—long-awaited in Ty time—but the seismic shifts happened entirely behind his eyelids; the all-acoustic, 10-track Sleeper, while concise and coherent, is more rock garden than mountain mover. Dislodged, perhaps, by the formation of interim power trio Fuzz, double LP Manipulator descends like an avalanche: an hour of Segall’s greatest hits cleaved into four unrelenting sides, the Whitman’s Sampler from an obese decade of psych/rock delicacies. It’s glammy and hammy, scorched and gorgeous, and by the time you read this, he will already have filed it away and followed it (with November’s cheekily cha-chinging sequel, $ingle$ 2). —Noah Bonaparte Pais

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11. TV On The Radio | Seeds (Harvest)
TVOTRPeople die. They change coasts. We move on. No one blinks an eye. Yet, when TV On The Radio lost bassist Gerard Smith three years ago from lung cancer, and the rest of the band left its cherished Brooklyn for the Hollywood Hills, the effects were seismic. And so, the art/skronk/ambient/doo-wop/soul/ jazz proffered on Seeds is more expansive in a mannerly— even sunshiny—psychedelic sense (“Could You” melds elements of the Grateful Dead and early Crazy Horse in a frothy mix), with buzzing, blobby, anthemic soul (the breezy “Careful You,” featuring frontman Tunde Adebimpe singing in French) and clicking, low-key rock to guide their groove. That’s notsaying that Smith held the band back. Nope. Rather, his dramatic bass anchored TVOTR spiritually and sonically through the sounds of a glorious freefall. Without him, they’ve found a different, less deconstructed brand of mooring. “Happy Idiot,” then, is a crisper-than-fresh-sheets example of the open, sensible clatter of TVOTR circa now, with co-vocalist Kyp Malone throwing in his two cents throughout. While new songs, particularly the aptly titled likes of “Winter” and “Lazerray,” maintain producer Dave Sitek’s usual, pre-Seeds muck-and-morass surround-sound vibe, “Happy Idiot” and “Careful You” are focused and fuzzy at the same time. Of this, Smith would be proud. —A.D. Amorosi

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10. St. Vincent | St. Vincent (Loma Vista/Republic)
StVincentAnnie Clark’s self-titled fourth album as St. Vincent doesn’t mark a dramatic shift in approach from 2011’s similarly singular Strange Mercy, nor is it a grand defining statement in any immediately obvious sense. Then again, little about Clark can really be described as “obvious” at this point (save perhaps that, as their recent collaboration demonstrated, she would and did make an ideal mirror/foil/counterpart/inheritor to David Byrne’s nervy-smart art-rock eminence). But St. Vincent earns its eponymity in how fully it embodies its creator’s essential idiosyncrasies. Of course, there is Clark’s merciless, mercurial guitar-wielding, often juxtaposed against some of her most tenderly lyrical vocal melodies. Like her previous work (but even more so), St. Vincent is rooted in the tensions (and slippages) between humanity and artificiality, a fascination that is not (only) esoterically conceptual—informing, amongst other things, her increasingly theatrical visual presentation and stagecraft—but also gleefully visceral, audible in everything from the nervous, kinetic digital sputters of “Rattlesnake” to the deliciously terrifying cyborg death-march of “Bring Me Your Loves” to the almost baroque lushness of “Severed Crossed Fingers.” For all its gestures toward relatability, even mundanity (“Take out the garbage, masturbate … ”), it’s an album that only seems more alien the more familiar it gets. —K. Ross Hoffman

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9. The New Pornographers | Brill Bruisers (Matador)
NewPornographersIt’s all too easy to take the New Pornographers for granted. It’s an unfortunate truism that consistency—even when operating at an exceedingly high level—can be confused with predictability. Not to mention what began as a small-scale supergroup under the guidance of Carl Newman might now look like a side project: The continually rising stars of Neko Case and Dan Bejar’s Destroyer can dim the collective excellence of the Pornographers. But Brill Bruisers deserves and rewards our attention. After two records that dialed back, at least a bit, on the Pornographers’ maximalist power pop, Brill Bruisers is a breathless joyride. It’s not exactly a return to their beginnings—the playful prominence of new-wave keyboards is novel, and Newman continues to find unique ways of crafting gang vocals, unexpected structural twists and densely detailed arrangements—but the band’s sixth record offers a similar experience: It’s a sugar rush, but one with lasting substance. Bejar’s requisite three songs are highlights, as are Case’s lead vocals on “Champions Of Red Wine” and others, but so are Newman’s own leads on songs like the title track. Really, it’s the Pornographers’ collective strength as a powerhouse unit that makes Brill Bruisers undeniable. —Steve Klinge

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8. Future Islands | Singles (4AD)
FutureIslandsBono called “Seasons (Waiting On You)”—this album’s opening track—“a miracle.” That may be overstating it, but perhaps not by much. If you haven’t seen the mesmerizing, incendiary version of the song as this Baltimore three-piece performed it on Letterman, stop reading and go directly to YouTube. Future Islands has been called synth-pop, but that’s a flimsy label. The spine here is ’80s new wave, sure, but the flesh, the heartbeat? Singer Samuel T. Herring’s one-of-a-kind vocal theatrics, raised up from some place deep in both his throat and his gut. Heartache, longing, rage, gentle sentimentality—Herring paints with all these colors, often within a single song. On “Seasons,” he surrenders to the notion that someone (a lover, friend, family) will never change; “A Song For Our Grandfathers” unfolds like an uncommonly well-written journal entry, a meditation on our short time here on Earth. From a sandpaper whisper to a soaring ache on “Light House” and a surprise death-metal howl on “Fall From Grace,” there’s something compelling and unexpected in each song. That may be the real miracle here. —Richard Rys

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7. Lydia Loveless | Somewhere Else (Bloodshot)
LydiaThe line between passion and desperation is perilously thin, and never more so than on Lydia Loveless’s pining odes to the ones who got away. There’s the married ex she drunk-dials (coked-up dials, actually) on “Really Wanna See You,” the guy who’s put a wingman in her way on “Wine Lips,” the banker who’s taken the family farm on “Everything’s Gone.” Though Loveless first wooed listeners by pairing a blunt, thoroughly modern lyrical sensibility with a traditional country sound, on Somewhere Else she crushes genre conventions like a broken heart beneath her boots. She and her tight band mine honky tonk and power pop for relentless riffs that crunch and swoon, the musical equivalent of the fuckin’ and fightin’ that fuels her characters. Whether she’s dredging old diaries for material or imagining other lives, she’s never less than 100 percent committed. It’s not always easy to look at the spurned, spiraling woman, but Loveless demands attention with her gutsy delivery, serious songwriting chops and impeccable sonic references that belie her 1990 birth, and turns every last song into something that’s both as fresh as a bruise and so catchy you could almost swear you’ve heard it a million times. —M.J. Fine

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6. Spoon | They Want My Soul (Loma Vista)
SpoonIt’s an impressive track record, to say the least: Spoon hasn’t let us down in at least 16 years. Bandleader Britt Daniel has made a career of immaculate assimilation, fully absorbing frequently noted influences like the Stones, the Pixies, Wire and Television into his ongoing vision of a bold indie-rock future free of cannibalistic A&R reps and unfounded assumptions of profundity. Daniel acknowledges as much on the title track to Spoon’s eighth full-length effort: “Educated folk singers want my soul/Jonathan Fisk still wants my soul/I got nothing I want to say to them.” Perhaps in spite of itself, Spoon—which, like MAGNET, marked its 21st birthday in 2014—remains a great band in the most rigorously cool sense. A more accessible extension of Daniels’ work with Divine Fits, They Want My Soul is as tight as an oil drum, its songwriting a slick compound of groove and melody. In punching up the rhythm section (i.e., founding drummer Jim Eno), the group largely abandons the collage-ish ennui of 2010’s Transference in favor of some of the catchiest tunes (“Do You,” “Let Me Be Mine” and “New York Kiss”) since 2001’s Girls Can Tell. In all, Daniel has come a long way toward perfecting his post-Surfer Rosa take on rhythm and blues. Where to go from here? Good question. —Hobart Rowland

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5. Against Me! | Transgender Dysphoria Blues (Total Treble/Xtra Mile)
AgainstMeThe compelling narrative of frontwoman Laura Jane Grace’s coming out as transgender—explored in depth via Jonathan Valania’s February MAGNET cover story—gave Transgender Dysphoria Blues a hooky back story, attracting plenty of listeners who’d probably otherwise have little interest in a self-released effort by a 17-year-old Florida punk band. And, of course, that story is undeniably central to the album, most of which speaks in no uncertain terms to the complex (and very punk rock) tangle of emotions—resentment, futility, isolation, confusion, awkwardness, self-loathing and ultimately defiant pride (less in the lyrics per se than in Grace’s searing, triumphant delivery of them)—accompanying her experience, and those of trans people more generally. These songs are not always as direct and legible as you might (or might not) expect, but they are never less than effective—equally potent as consciousness-raisers, psychological portraits and conflicted-yet-rousing empowerment anthems. What kept us listening all year long, however, is simply that this is among 2014’s best and most thrilling rock ‘n’ roll albums: a breathless half-hour of lean, surging riffs and pummeling drums, ready and primed for fistpumping sing-alongs, as much in line with the guitar-rock classicism of Ted Leo or the Hold Steady as with any number of populist punk touchstones. —K. Ross Hoffman

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4. The War On Drugs | Lost In The Dream (Secretly Canadian)
WarOnDrugsAs if we needed further evidence of Rolling Stone’s prolonged decent into dementia, Lost In The Dream garnered a middling three-star review upon release, while Songs Of Innocence, U2’s exceedingly blah, A-list-producer-larded freebie statement received a masterpiece designation. WTF? The War On Drugs’ third studio LP boasts deceptively complex textures and an epic ’80s-AOR ambition steered in all sorts of compelling directions by an unerring sense of melodic drama and tasteful guitar wankery. If that sounds a little like U2 in its Reagan-era prime, any implied parallels are intentional. It says a lot about the album’s staying power that the good vibes have continued some nine months after its release. As with many great LPs, it rewards restraint to give Lost In The Dream a rest for a few months. A fresh listen allows once-buried nuances to surface on tracks like the pulsing “Under The Pressure,” live highlight “Burning,” the Dylan-ish title track and majestic closer “In Reverse.” For an album so admittedly fussed over by its creator, the whole thing flows with an easy, inevitable grace. Mark Kozelek: Suck my cock. Lost In The Dream is the best “beer commercial guitar” album of the year … and more. —Hobart Rowland

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3. The Both | The Both (Superego)
BothWith apologies to the Nobel Prize-winning scientists who developed super-resolved fluorescence microscopy, The Both is this year’s most successful chemistry experiment. The pairing of Aimee Mann and Ted Leo did not result in a violent reaction—if that’s your thing, go creep out in a dark corner with Scott Walker + Sunn O))). Instead, the two musicians complement each other in subtle and restrained ways, with Mann’s placid, noble strum blanketing Leo’s rougher electric-guitar edges. The Both suggests that almost any song in the universe could be improved upon by Mann’s vocal harmonies; she glides effortlessly where Leo has to lift a little harder to carry his end of the tune. The two sometimes sound like an undercaffeinated New Pornographers—they are blatantly enamored with Thin Lizzy, and one song on the album (“You Can’t Help Me Now”) is so sad that you worry about the severity of the situation for all parties involved. Finding a mid-career musical foil—one who not only masks flaws, but plays to strengths— is rare, and to make it all sound so natural on the first attempt is rarer still. —Matthew Fritch

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2. Freeman | FREEMAN (Partisan)
FreemanTo see Aaron Freeman (née Gene Ween) tour behind his first post-Ween solo record of original material was to watch a true American middleweight champ take the ring again, and win by a knockout. Ween didn’t almost kill Freeman—his own deeply addictive personality nearly did that for him. But having decided he had no option but to walk away from one of the most creative and truly original bands in American pop music, Freeman went into the studio and came out with a set of songs that tell the story of his journey from rock-bottom terror, through healing, to creative rebirth. Considered only as a collection of songs, FREEMAN is one of the best you’ll hear this year, sweet and quirky and somber and thoughtful by turns. Considered as a statement of one artist on the perils that accompany the seduction of sensory derangement, it’s one of the most direct and honest pieces of art in recent memory. And as the diary of a regular dude whose passions almost got him dead and who came out the other side glad and grateful, it’s a thing of nonstop beauty. Gener’s dead: Long live the Freeman. —Eric Waggoner

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1. Ex Hex | Rips (Merge)
ExHexIn a year that saw some amazing guitarists—Nels Cline, Steve Gunn, William Tyler—do some amazing things on six strings, nobody shredded harder than Mary Timony. We’re talking about the most literal album title of 2014; from beginning to end, Rips is an exhibition of the former Helium and Wild Flag frontlady’s gnarly fret work. The record is a blast of bubblegum proto-punk and gritty, glammed-up power pop, with more attitude and amplitude than we’ve heard this side of our bootleg Thin Lizzy VHS and Suzi Quatro singles. Rips is the kind of party record that heretofore only existed in fiction and the wild daydreams of Riff Randell and Kate Rambeau. This is a record for anyone who’s ever argued about Humble Pie albums and has deep-rooted feelings about Beserkley Records b-sides. We appreciate forward-thinking, envelope-pushing music, but guitarmonies on top of power chords on top of that Phil Rudd pocket with the woo-oh-ohs will always trump whatever progressive pretensions we may have. Any other year, we’d be griping that they don’t make albums like that anymore, but this year Ex Hex made an album just like that, and we will be ripping it well into 2015. —Sean L. Maloney

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Best Of 2014: Reissues

RobertWyatt

MAGNET’s A.D. Amorosi picks the best reissues of the year

1 Robert Wyatt Different Every Time (Domino)
2 Sun Ra Sun Ra And His Arkestra In The Orbit Of Ra (Strut)
3 Stevie Ray Vaughan The Complete Epic Recordings Collection (Legacy)
4 The Velvet Underground The Velvet Underground: 45th Anniversary Super Deluxe Edition (Polydor/UMe)
5 King Crimson Starless (Discipline)
6 Various Artists Hardcore Traxx: Dance Mania Records 1986-1997 (Strut)
7 Lewis L’amour (Light In The Attic)
8 Joni Mitchell Love Has Many Faces (Rhino)
9 The Kinks The Anthology 1964-1971 (BMG/In Grooves)
10 Bob Dylan And The Band The Basement Tapes Complete: The Bootleg Series Vol. 11 (Columbia)

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Best Of 2014: Indie Roots

Hurray

MAGNET’s Devon Leger picks the best indie-roots releases of the year

1 Hurray For The Riff Raff Small Town Heroes (ATO)
2 Lavender Country Lavender Country (Paradise Of Bachelors)
3 Luke Winslow-King Everlasting Arms (Bloodshot)
4 Hiss Golden Messenger Lateness Of Dancers (Merge)
5 The Barr Brothers Sleeping Operator (Secret City)
6 Willie Watson Folk Singer Vol. 1 (Acony)
7 Béla Fleck & Abigail Washburn Béla Fleck & Abigail Washburn (Rounder)
8 Jonah Tolchin Clover Lane (Yep Roc)
9 Lynched Cold Old Fire (self-released)
10 The Furrow Collective At Our Next Meeting (Furrow)

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Best Of 2014: Hard Rock

Mastodon

MAGNET’s Matt Ryan picks the best hard-rock releases of the year

1 Mastodon Once More ’Round The Sun (Reprise)
2 Eyehategod Eyehategod (Housecore)
3 Wild Throne Blood Maker (Brutal Panda)
4 Corrosion Of Conformity IX (Candlelight)
5 John Garcia John Garcia (Napalm)
6 Wolves Like Us Black Soul Choir (Prosthetic)
7 Crowbar Symmetry In Black (eOne)
8 My Goodness Shiver + Shake (Votiv)
9 Nick Oliveri’s Uncontrollable Leave Me Alone (Schnitzel)
10 Down Down IV, Pt. II (Down)

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Best Of 2014: Singer/Songwriter

SharonVanEtten

MAGNET’s Hobart Rowland picks the best singer/songwriter releases of the year

1 Sharon Van Etten Are We There (Jagjaguwar)
2 Sturgill Simpson Metamodern Sounds In Country Music (High Top Mountain)
3 Simone Felice Strangers (Dualtone)
4 Sun Kil Moon Benji (Caldo Verde)
5 Saint Saviour In The Seams (Surface Area)
6 Tweedy Sukierae (dBpm)
7 Beck Morning Phase (Capitol)
8 Hurray For The Riff Raff Small Town Heroes (ATO)
9 Justin Townes Earle Single Mothers (Vagrant)
10 Doug Paisley Strong Feelings (No Quarter)

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Best Of 2014: Ambient

BitchinBajas

MAGNET’s Jakob Dorof picks the best ambient releases of the year

1  Bitchin Bajas Bitchin Bajas (Drag City)
2  Dolphins Into The Future & Lieven Martens Moana Songs Of Gold, Incandescent (self-released)
3  Trent Reznor And Atticus Ross Gone Girl OST (Columbia)
4  Kyle Bobby Dunn Kyle Bobby Dunn And The Infinite Sadness (Students Of Decay)
5  Lawrence English Wilderness Of Mirrors (Room40)
6  Jon Porras Light Divide (Thrill Jockey)
7  A Winged Victory For The Sullen Atomos (Kranky)
8  Christopher Bissonnette Essays In Idleness (Kranky)
9  Auburn Lull Hiber (Geographic North)
10 Nicholas Szczepanik Not Knowing (Desire Path)

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Best Of 2014: Metal

Boris

MAGNET’s Andrew Earles picks the best metal releases of the year

1 Boris Noise (Sargent House)
2 Tombs Savage Gold (Relapse)
3 Pallbearer Foundations Of Burden (Profound Lore)
4 Electric Wizard Time To Die (Spinefarm)
5 Exodus Blood In, Blood Out (Nuclear Blast)
6 Godflesh A World Only Lit By Fire (Avalanche)
7 Goatwhore Constricting Rage Of The Merciless (Metal Blade)
8 Incantation Dirges Of Elysium (Listenable)
9 Agalloch The Serpent And The Sphere (Profound Lore)
10 Dead Congregation Promulgation Of The Fall (Martyrdoom/Profound Lore)

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Best Of 2014: Jazz/Improv

Wrack

MAGNET’s Bill Meyer picks the best jazz/improv releases of the year

1 Kyle Bruckmann’s Wrack …Awaits Silent Tristero’s Empire (Singlespeed)
2 Brötzmann Adasiewicz Edwards Noble Mental Shake (Otoroku)
3 AMM Place Sub. V. (Matchless)
4 Matt Bauder And Day In Pictures Nightshades (Clean Feed)
5 Rob Mazurek Mother Ode (Corbett Vs. Dempsey)
6 Russ Johnson Meeting Point (Relay)
7 Cymerman Wooley Parker World Of Objects (5049)
8 Steve Lehman Octet Mise En Abîme (Pi)
9 Keir Neuringer Ceremonies Of The Air (New Atlantis)
10 Travis Laplante’s Battle Trance Palace Of Wind (New Amsterdam)

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