Film At 11: Chad VanGaalen

Chad VanGaalen will release his seventh album, Light Information, on September 8 via Sub Pop. In the meantime, we’re bringing you his video for “Pine And Clovers,” a mixture of 2-D and hand-drawn animation that tells the story of a shapeshifter.Watch it below.

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MP3 At 3PM: Karla Kane

Karla Kane will release her first solo LP, King’s Daughters Home For Incurables, on October 6. “The Lilac Line” is our entry point, a sunny pop song defined by Kane’s effervescent vocals and her jaunty ukulelee plucking. Check it out below.

“The Lilac Line” (download):

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Essential New Music: Lindsey Buckingham Christine McVie’s “Lindsey Buckingham Christine McVie”

A lot of water has passed under a good many bridges since Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie paired up for any significant creative endeavors, from Buckingham’s continued evolution as a solo artist to McVie’s semi-retirement from the road and studio to a new Fleetwood Mac album and tour with little involvement from her and, finally, her 2014 return to the band. If the announcement that this particular twosome was pairing up for a tandem album was a shock, the results are even more surprising.

There’s a breezy pop lilt running through much of Lindsey Buckingham Christine McVie that predates their huge success, as if the duo was drawing on influences and experiences from hazy ’60s memories. “Sleeping Around The Corner,” originally a bonus track from Buckingham’s Seeds We Sow in 2011, opens the album with the kind of wide-eyed innocence found on AM pop radio playlists half a century ago, while McVie channels her inner Cilla Black on the gorgeous and evocative “Game Of Pretend.” Meanwhile, “Lay Down For Free” could have been conceived when Buckingham was playing guitar and trading harmonies with Don Everly in the early ’70s.

There are flashes of later inspirations as well. “Feel About You” features lyrical and jangly musical references to Buckingham’s production/performance turn for pal Walter Egan on his Not Shy album. With “Too Far Gone,” Buckingham goes full-metal Tusk on guitar and percussion while McVie inhabits the obsessive love song with her requisite smoky passion. The album concludes with the slinky snake charm of “Carnival Begin,” an aching reverie that stylistically touches on Mac’s Bob Welch era before drifting out on Buckingham’s stinging guitar coda. Lindsey Buckingham Christine McVie could be viewed as a scrapbook of past glories or a signpost to future intentions, but the overwhelming success of this unexpected Mac mashup is clear evidence that it’s more than a one-off idea.

—Brian Baker

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From The Desk Of Preservation Hall Jazz Band: Music In New Orleans

Like most New Orleans-born-and-bred musicians, Ben Jaffe understands music not as a byproduct of the human experience but as a heart-deep part of that experience itself. Jaffe—tuba player, bassist and current leader/co-composer for the venerable Preservation Hall Jazz Band—comes by it honest, as they say. In 1961, his parents founded the Preservation Hall venue, a performance space especially notable during the Jim Crow era for being one of a handful in New Orleans open to both white and black players. What started as the venue’s de facto house band is now a pillar of the city’s musical history: a live performance, recording and educational outreach project 55 years strong and counting. PHJB’s new album, So It Is, continues the band’s longstanding custom of preserving and contributing new material to traditional New Orleans acoustic music. Jaffe will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our feature on the band.

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Jaffe: It’s not that we take live music in New Orleans for granted—we absolutely don’t—but we are used to hearing it every day. Our days are filled with passing parades, street bands, parties, festivals, concerts and going to church and funerals. Not a day goes by that I don’t stumble upon a live band. Perhaps this is how it should be everywhere. Music is who we are; it is essential to us, like food or air. It nourishes our soul. And the music of New Orleans is popping! From the young brass bands like TBC and Young Fellas to the rapper 5th Ward Weebie to the experimentalist Quintron, New Orleans has more going on than anywhere else in the world!

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Film At 11: Frankie Rose

Frankie Rose has released a video for dreamy tune “Red Museum,” off Cage Tropical (Grey Market/Slumberland). The clip, which was directed by Geneva Jacuzzi, centers on a man at an art gallery, who later ends up being sucked into one of the pieces. Check it out now.

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MP3 At 3PM: J Hacha De Zola

J Hacha De Zola has had a busy couple of years. On October 6, he’ll release Antipatico, his third album in two years, but this whirlwind of musical inspiration doesn’t mean a decline in quality. “No Situation” is a large, spinning rock ‘n’ roll affair as enticing as it is distant and strange. Check it out below.

“No Situation” (download):

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Beth Ditto: Sweet Talk

The Gossip’s Beth Ditto goes solo on Fake Sugar

Beth Ditto is not a woman to suffer fools gladly. As forthright and incendiary in her conversation as she is in her role as frontperson for the Gossip since its 1999 inception, Ditto has long been a blunt force of nature when it comes to LGBT rights, marriage equality, politics and matters of female form, size and stature in fashion and the workplace.

“For me, it’s about punk intersectional feminism—an incredible movement to watch grow from the inside,” she says proudly. “I feel so lucky to be alive now and be part of a movement so dedicated and unapologetic about our bodies and open about our experiences.”

Ditto’s newest music, however, shows a different side to the mellow-harshing songwriter and baritone crooner.

“The record was already wrapped up before the election, so believe me, had it not been finished, it would’ve been on,” says Ditto, talking about the more subtle lyrical and sonic shadings of Fake Sugar, her debut solo album away from the throes of the taut, tough Gossip

After five independent releases and two major-label albums (her current home is Virgin), the Gossip called it a day. “There are things that have happened that I’m not sure will allow us to be a band again,” says Ditto. “In my heart it feels gone … Before, everything had come pretty easily, creatively speaking, of course. All of a sudden it felt like pulling teeth. So when the label suggested I work with different songwriters to make a Gossip record, I did, and of course, they weren’t Gossip songs. And I really was hard on myself about that. But it dawned on me how ridiculous that was. Of course they weren’t Gossip songs. But they were still really good songs.”

So after several years of trying to connect, Ditto didn’t. Instead of beating a dead horse, she decided to make her own record and texted her Gossip bandmates to that effect.

“And just like that,” she says, “it was over.”

The Southern-inspired Fake Sugar, complete with twanging F-hole guitars and synthetic percussion, is rich in harmonies and the reality of romance rather than the soppy, storybook kind. The idea of Alan Vega—the late singer/screamer and abstract-impressionist lyricist of Suicide—comes up throughout Fake Sugar, as “Go Baby Go,” “Fire” and the whole twanging Southern Gothic-ness of the album is steeped in his brand of echo and caterwauling.

“I just wanted to do something a little special for him,” says Ditto. “He is an icon, and I needed to point that out.”

Asked if songs such as “Lover” (“about a feeling of independence”) or the album’s other tales of relationships are about Ditto’s new wife, she says, “I don’t really know. I think they’re mostly songs about my internal dialogue about trust, traveling, lifetime commitment. Also, I love to hear the interpretations journalists and listeners have. Sometimes they’re more spot-on than mine.”

The softer spots and handsomely manicured harmonic layers on songs such as the title track, “Savoir Faire” and “In And Out” feel lived in rather than brand new or freshly formed. It’s almost as if Ditto had been planning to explore these sounds even before Fake Sugar.

“I feel like really I could do that in the Gossip, too,” says Ditto. “But the songs just kept never happening. I wouldn’t say it was something I’d been waiting to do as much as a Gossip record just wasn’t coming to fruition, so I just let go of any Gossip sound limitations. I learned to trust myself and to trust other people outside of my group of nearest and dearest. For so long there had been two people I could always rely on. There was a consensus of people I knew since childhood and developed a language of music and aesthetic. Humor. All those things. A real family. Making this record was like learning to love again. Does that make sense?”

A.D Amorosi

 

 

 

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From The Desk Of Preservation Hall Jazz Band: Documentary Film

Like most New Orleans-born-and-bred musicians, Ben Jaffe understands music not as a byproduct of the human experience but as a heart-deep part of that experience itself. Jaffe—tuba player, bassist and current leader/co-composer for the venerable Preservation Hall Jazz Band—comes by it honest, as they say. In 1961, his parents founded the Preservation Hall venue, a performance space especially notable during the Jim Crow era for being one of a handful in New Orleans open to both white and black players. What started as the venue’s de facto house band is now a pillar of the city’s musical history: a live performance, recording and educational outreach project 55 years strong and counting. PHJB’s new album, So It Is, continues the band’s longstanding custom of preserving and contributing new material to traditional New Orleans acoustic music. Jaffe will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our feature on the band.

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Jaffe: I’ve always loved documentaries and the people who make them. We’re surrounded by incredible stories. There’s something beautiful about watching a story unfold onscreen. I’ve always considered live musical performances on film a type of documentary. I started watching live performances on film in high school. Back then, everything was on VHS. If I heard about a Miles Davis, John Coltrane or Duke Ellington concert on tape, I would scour flea markets, used book stores and record stores for bootleg copies. There were some great spots in Cleveland and New York with incredible collections of shows on tape. Each tape held it’s own importance because it took so much of effort to learn about, track down and acquire. I vividly remember the day I came across the very rare and highly coveted unreleased Rolling Stones tour documentary Cocksucker Blues by Robert Frank in a tiny used book store in Los Angeles. It felt like I had struck gold. On another occasion, a friend gave me an interview and performance of my parents from the 1960s in Japan.

Some favorite directors include: D.A. Pennebaker, Les Blank, Robert Frank and Bruce Webber. Some of my favorite films: Streetwise, Hoop Dreams, Hands On A Hard Body, Crumb, Piano Players Rarely Play Together, American Movie, Soul Power and We Were Kings, Bayou Maharaja, Nanook Of The North, Let’s Get Lost, Harlan County, No Direction Home. Each film is unique and beautiful.

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Film At 11: Beaches

Our favorite Australian psych-rock group Beaches has released a video for “Void,” the first single from new double album Second Of Spring (Chapter Music). In the black-and-white clip, footage of the band is displayed in various shapes, giving the viewer an engaging visual experience. Check it out below.

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MAGNET Feedback With Joseph Arthur (The Director’s Cut)

Each issue, we ask a different artist who we feel has good, insightful taste in music for their feedback on 10 or so songs we choose for them. It’s a generally straightforward, two-page feature that we feel people enjoy reading. We asked longtime MAGNET fave Joseph Arthur to do one for issue #143, and below is what he sent in. It’s a really good piece, but in order to make it fit into our print format, we had to do quite a bit of editing on it before we ran it. Needless to say, Mr. Arthur liked his original version better than our edited version, which ran on the site earlier today. (Check it out here.) So we told him we’d run this original piece online, as well as the very cool piece of art he supplied with it. Consider this The Joseph Arthur Director’s Cut. Enjoy.

Brian Eno’s tin foil hat or how I tried and failed to write a piece for Magnet by Joseph Arthur
My manager said “hey I need that piece for Magnet by monday. ” we were having our Friday wrap up conversation, you know the one, where you are both looking at the weekend and so everything is a little lighter. Life doesn’t seem impossible at all. This was no Tuesday. It was Friday. But you have to be careful in Friday’s because that free and easy feeling can lead you to say yes to something you perhaps should say no too. In other words your ass may write a check that your dreams can’t cash? How does that phrase go? I’m pretty sure that’s not it and I’m gonna pretend it’s 1979 and so there’s no google. I’m gonna go with God on this one.
I said to my manager
In that overly confident and quick to get off the phone way. ” what is it ?”
“Oh I sent you the email”
“Oh cool ” I went on “Ill knock it out, as long as I don’t have to write a Shakespearean play I can’t imagine having a problem with what ever it is”
We were loose it was Friday
I quipped
” well actually even if it was a Shakespearean play I could probably do that” my Friday over confidence had gotten its grips on me to near pathology at that point. You know the feeling. Monday seems like a million years away. Almost like it will never be monday again.
Here’s what an outbreak of the disease looks like. You go into a kind of zone in which if anyone asks you to anything at that time which will be do monday you will without even understanding why just automatically say yes.
So sure you are that monday is practically years away. But here’s the thing. It’s not. It never is. So we set up an organization called OCFA
Over
Confident
Friday
Anonymous
The only requirement is a desire to stop making proclamations on Friday afternoons about things you’ll need to deal with monday morning.

But I missed my meetings. I said yes to a monday obligation right in the zone of the Friday eternities
The Friday eternities are what we aim to be sober from. The Friday eternities are similar to what alcohol would be in AA. I e “the feeling that Friday will never ever end and if it does it will just be Saturday forever. And if god forbid that ended well then Sunday is just fine for eternity. But when monday does come and you come too with all the fog of your grand proclamations of achievement. The activity around your head like a cartoon mix up with keystone cops a mouse in a suit and a dandelion tree that two orphans are trying to light ablaze with a wet pack of Ohio blue tips.

It was monday morning the guilt shame and remorse for knowing I had relapsed with a bad case of the Friday eternities
And remembered the good natured and affable conversation with my manager and how I had boldly said yes to lengthy writing assignment sight unseen and it was do today!
The voices flooded in “why did you say yes!?”
The toxic shame like an expert archer on high peek taking aim to the center of my skull as I opened the email of what I had said yes too.

And here’s what came up

This piece will run online and in the actual print publication. Can you work on this, this week?

Here’s a sample of what they would like you to write about.. The intro should be about Redemption’s Son 15th. After that, it’s your thoughts on these 10 or 15 tracks:
(Note – Magnet picked all of these tracks)

Example

Here’s 15. We only need 10, but we can run the rest online if he wants to do all of them. They are alphabetical, but he can do in any order he wants.

The Afghan Whigs “Gentleman”
The Band “The Weight”
The Black Keys “Tighten Up”
Blondie “Rapture”
Coldplay “Viva La Vida”
Bob Dylan “As Time Goes By”
Brian Eno “Needles In The Camel’s Eye”
Genesis “Back In N.Y.C.”
George Harrison “Isn’t It A Pity”
Diana Krall “Glad Rag Doll”
The National “Bloodbuzz Ohio”
Liz Phair “Never Said”
Lou Reed “Romeo Had Juliette”
The Rolling Stones “Rocks Off”
Suzanne Vega “Tom’s Diner”

Well at least I can do any order I want.
My palms got sweaty. My heart raced. A lifetime flashed before me. I got a case of the hiccups and peed my pants a little. I looked over the list
Oh no.. please don’t say it’s one of these things where I gotta say how much I like this or that. Oh no!

I mean I like The Weight as much as the next guy but how am I gonna come up with a paragraph on it?

My head started scrambling.
All I could think about is what it must have been like to hang with Martin Scorsese and Robby Robertson when they famously lived in a blacked out party house together where they were always gaked up. And how that’s when Marty made Raging Bull and shit like that. That I could try and write a paragraph about but how am I gonna say something about The Weight?
” I remember that time I sparked up a doobie and it was full moon and it was our summer of love and there was like all these butterflies in the parking lot and we had just dropped acid and it was coming on and we were out in your t windowed corvette. You had the radio on and the dj on the classic rock station we alway listened too said and now this one from Robbie Robertson and The Band. And then that song. That song that’s like everybody’s favorite song at one point or another. Transcends race. Transcends time. A great song has a spirit in it. This one is so identifiable. And profound that it almost feels wrong to speak on it. But it does make me want to take acid and drive around in a vette with tbird windows.

Normally I might call Greg in a time like this. He’s always got a good take on things. Funny and dark and then we just wind up talking about girls we are both in love with on Instagram. (True Hollywood confessions.
What would I write about Greg? I’ve said it all. We’ve laughed we’ve cried.
I remember Gentleman came out and I had it on cd and listened to it on my cd walk man. There were beneficial limitations back then. You know how sometimes you lock a certain memory with a certain album. That album always reminds me of a flight I took because I discovered on a flight and listened to it the whole trip. That was the good thing about not having endless options. Made you focus on one thing. I focused on Greg’s voice and lyrics. I was just starting to write songs at that point so I listened with intention all the time then. I was still forming my own musical identity. If I had to put my feeling about what Greg does in a quip designed for bathroom fodder. It would be this. He’s original. And he’s rock n roll. So. Nuff said.
Ps. Those two things are rarer than diamonds who are also a girls best friend. Plus he’s from Ohio. Which I notice quite a few folks in this list are
Suddenly in my writing assignment I feel like I’m going deep in. Like Magnet has me searching for my inner captain Kurtz “never get out of the boat. Absolutely god damn right! Never get out of the boat. Read this next part in Martin Sheens voice like apocalypse now. “Who put this list together, where did they get their intel. For years this Joseph Arthur was the model soldier of rock and then one day he wrote a song about how there was no song. was no rock. There was no man. There’s was no song. He just blew a gasket. He’s not coming back. I think he’s waiting for me deep in that jungle he’s waiting for me to come make sure there will never be another monday again. Or another case of the Friday eternities. ”

I could tell Magnet was leading me straight into my very own apocalypse now. In which I am both Kurtz and (side note what is the Martin Sheen characters name? Remember this is a period piece so google is not an option) anyway the Martin Sheen character. Side note to the side note. Which song on this list Magnet gave me would be Charlie sheens favorite? That’s a fun article. I could write an article on that.

Anyway I wanted to get out of the boat even tho the voices kept repeating. Never get out of the boat absolutely goddam right. Never get out of the boat.

I texted my manager
I was breaking out all over the place with a case of the PMDM’s
Post
Melt
Down
Monday’s.

It went like this.
“Hey Keith happy monday. Gimme a shout on that magnet thing. It’s a real pain to write about songs. Can you imagine writing a paragraph about a Coldplay song? Or even about one you like? Think of the adage talking about music is like dancing about architecture. Don’t want to leave you out in the lurch and if you think it’s an important thing to do I will dig deep but doing it will be well… just imagine having to write a paragraph about the band song ‘the weight’ I mean.
Where do you even begin? I remember the first time I heard “the weight’ it was a real good song. The band are amazing. See what I mean? ”

He didn’t and still hasn’t responded. Cheap joke on Coldplay. I don’t actually feel that way. Everyone knows Chris can make melody his bitch in ways that are unique to him and let’s face it endlessly appealing. Besides no ones ever gonna be cooler than The Replacements anyway so who really cares?
It’s the kind of joke you make on a defeated monday
A day when the PMDMs are really getting the better of you. I guess the price of ubiquitous fame and fortune is that you become a punching bag for people in moments like these. I’d take that trade. Haha.
Coldplay should use this on their next ad campaign
“Coldplay! a band that’s easy to slag on a monday
But impossible not to fink are ace on a Friday! ”

Or Coldplay
the band most people hate on monday but oddly love the fuck out of on Saturday night.
Hell that should be the name of their next record. You’re welcome Chris.

My manager never got back to me so I decided to take a few bong hits and go skateboard. I ride my longboard along the promenade in brooklyn over looking the whole of manhattan. From Redhook to dumbo and back again. It’s like heaven in the spring. Always helps me get ideas. So I rip the bong a few times and then grab my phone and my board and my keys. I notice a news alert on my phone. There was a story about certain unnamed news agencies were getting paid laundered money from china to pay off some Russian ambassador who played pranks on the line Chief Justice and gold handed prophet son and sergeant of mexico. The piece went on to say mind control directives were placed in specifically three songs. (And here’s what got my attention). They were Tighten up by the black keys. Rupture by blondie) and isn’t it a pity by george Harrison. I felt a shiver run up my spine. Wait a minute!? What the hell is going on here?! I Dug out the songlist from magnet and just as I had thought. Those three songs were all on my list. I suddenly started connecting dots. Things weren’t what they seemed. Never get out of the boat. Absolutely goddam right. But that was a joke. I had been out of the boat for a long time. I’m not sure there was even a boat at all. For some reason I had the KISS song black diamond in my head. But not their own version. The version that’s on Let It Be by The Replacements. Neither of those bands were even on the list. Which yes I was free to alphabetize but I couldn’t just talk about anyband I want all Willie nilly. There had to be some measure of control in this piece. I looked long and hard at myself in that jungle when another Replacements Song came thru my mind. Unsatisfied. But they aren’t on your list so why won’t this song leave me be?
“Look me in the eye and tell me that I’m satisfied are you satisfied.” Or however it goes. What’s with Minneapolis and the best songwriters in history? Dylan and Westerberg
Dylan’s on the list but Westerbergs not hmm. Pieces are adding up. Things people said. Fragments I had forgotten about. I started picking up things in the street and putting together a cap made out of tin foil. But JUST then a song started blaring as if the tin foil hat had been a finely adjusted radio antenna to only one song and it was screaming now as if it was coming from manhattan itself. Like the buildings were all signing it to me all at once. And it was “needles in the camels eye.”
I love weird rock songs by English geniuses. And this is one of the best. Why is the city singing this one. He’s on the list. I guess it triggered something. Now the Empire State Building is swaying back and forth to the beat. I’m frazzled at this point the way a fighter is who is two rounds beat already but just won’t stay down.
I gotta get out of this.
Need to write my manager and tell him I just can’t think of a creative way to write this piece. “Tell them I said sorry Keith”
Still waiting for a response.
Joe

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